Now Reading
What is Dhime?

What is Dhime?

Avatar

The Dhimay, Dhimaya, or Dhime is a drum, and it is classified as a double-headed cylindrical membranophone by Sachs-Hornbostel.

  • As compared to other drums played by the Newars in Nepal, this drum is relatively large. 
women playing dime

via: wikipedia

  • This instrument varies in diameter from 40 inches to 51 inches and in length from 17 inches to 21 inches. 
dhime

via: Pinterest

  • The drum’s shell can consist of wood or metal. Sometimes wooden drums are partially covered with metal foil. 
  • The shape of old Dhimay drums is uneven, resulting from the natural form of the wood that makes up the drum body. 
dhime

via: Flickr

  • Drums today are cylindrical or slightly barrel-shaped. Their heads are of goatskin. Red tuning paste (similar to the Syahi) used inside the left membrane, called Mankhah (Haima in Bhaktapur).
  • There are two types of dhimay. It is called “Dhaacha Dhimay” for the smaller ones and “Ma Dhimay” for the larger ones.
group of people playing dhime

via: Youtube

  • On the left side (Mankhah), the left-hand plays either horizontally or vertically to produce a long, resonating sound. Nasah is played using a thin stick made of cane and has a curved end.
group of people playing dhime

via: Pinterest

  • The fourth type of stroke is played in addition to the three basic strokes, combining the low-resonating sound of the left hand, i.e. the stroke of the right hand.
  • Mahadev is said to have invented the instrument, according to local legends. Drums have been used since the Kirata kingdom. They are primarily played by the Jyapu. Shrestha’s, Ranjitkars, and other castes also play it.
dhime

via: Flickr

The dhime played with other instruments in a traditional setting, mostly idiophones, the types being tailored to local traditions.
Dhime-ensembles, also known as Dhimaybaja, augment the drums with cymbals called Bhusyah and Chushyah and a gong-like instrument called Tai-nai. Often sometimes, special occasions require shawm musicians of the Kapali (hon.) or Jugi (coll.) castes, which are professional tailors and musicians. Navabaja (or Naubaja)-Ensembles also play the Dhimay. With musicians looking for ways to develop popular music rooted in traditional music, the Dhimay has recently been used as a bass drum, accompanying western instruments such as guitars.

Blog Edited By Ritika Gupta

For more “Music” related blogs click here.

What's Your Reaction?
Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0
View Comments (0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll To Top